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Adios Mexico City

Adios Mexico City

Tenochtitlán

Map showing the layout of one section of Tenochtitlán as Mexico City was once known

The sun rose and shone characteristically brightly on our last day in Mexico City. It had been an epic four days, with so much to see and take in. With such a rich and fascinating history and so many different cultures and languages, I found it amusing to compare with my homeland of England, where we speak English, and English only. The presence and influence of the Spanish obviously can’t be ignored when you visit Mexico, but there is so much more to the country than the Spanish influence alone. The native Mexica peoples and their forebears essentially created what the Spanish then came and dominated. Spain came hungry for gold and land to conquer. They took what they could get and it was often a brutal and bloody process. Fortunately however, the legacy of the Mesoamerican civilization still survives in relics, ornate stonework, sculptures, friezes and frescos, costumery and even in some texts. If you’re visiting Mexico City and are interested in history, culture and art, then you should most certainly head to the National Anthropology Museum. It’s the most visited museum in all of Mexico, attracting footfall of two million people a year, and was designed by three architects, namely Pedro Ramírez VázquezJorge Campuzano and Rafael Mijares. Built from volcanic stone hewn from a nearby site, the expansiveness of the space is quite a spectacle in itself, and the artefacts housed inside create yet more marvel. 

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The original Aztec stone of the sun, an emblematic mandala.

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Street vendors selling fruit and sweets, frequently seen around tourist areas.

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This incredible mural was designed by Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo’s husband. It illustrates the history of Mexico and adorns the walls of the National Palace.

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The motley crew of travel writers assembled to gaze at Rivera's masterpiece.

The motley crew of travel writers assembled to gaze at Rivera’s masterpiece.

We were fortunate enough to have a fantastic guide named Myrta, whose factual knowledge of detail was scholarly to say the least. Anything we wanted or needed to know, she was able to tell us or at least to find out. Contact me should you be planning a trip to Mexico City and I will gladly make the necessary introduction.

It only remains for me to thank Aeromexico for making this trip possible, the Mexico City tourist board for providing Myrta’s boundless energy and insight, and Starwood hotels for accomodating us in the Sheraton Maria Isabel.

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